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Election 2012: Measure B1 Just Shy of 2/3 Vote Needed to Pass

Alameda County transportation tax measure falls just shy of 66.6 percent vote mark needed to pass, according to unofficial results.

Election 2012: Measure B1 Just Shy of 2/3 Vote Needed to Pass

Unofficial results show a proposed measure to extend a current half-cent sale tax hike and add an additional half-cent to help pay for transportation projects fell just short of the 66.6 percent vote it needed to pass.

Measure B1 finished with 65.54 percent of the vote, according to unofficial results from the Alameda County registrar.

Further details from the measure's official statement:

This measure seeks voter approval of an ordinance that provides for the following three items: (1) an extension in perpetuity of the existing one-half of one percent (0.5%) transactions and use tax for transportation purposes, currently set to expire in March of 2022; (2) an increase to the transactions and use tax by one-half of one percent (0.5%) resulting in a total tax of one percent (1%); and (3) the Alameda County Transportation Commission’s (“Commission”) authority to issue limited tax bonds.

Here's a breakdown of how the funding would be spent, according to the Alameda County Transportation Expenditure Plan (TEP) — nearly $7.8 billion in investments that would be funded over the next 30 years:

  • 48 percent of the tax proceeds will fund public and specialized
    transit
  • 30 percent of the tax proceeds will fund improvements to local streets and roads
  • 9 percent of the tax proceeds will be spent on highway efficiency and freight development
  • 8 percent of the tax proceeds will be used for bicycle and pedestrian infrastructure
  • 5 percent of the tax proceeds will fund sustainable land use and transportation projects.

Measure B1 supporters say:

Alameda County residents need reliable and efficient transportation options for a better quality of life, stronger economy, and cleaner environment. The continuation and extension of this measure will allow critical transportation projects to move ahead uninterrupted.

Further details at http://www.YesonB1.com.

Opponents say:

This measure increases taxes on all income levels. It puts control of transportation decisions in the hands of Alameda County Transportation Commission (ACTC) who will use their taxing authority and resources to fund inefficient, expensive, and underutilized public transportation systems at the expense of automobile drivers.

Further information at http://www.VoteNoMeasureB1.com.

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