22 Aug 2014
65° Clear
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by malibuseastars
Patch Instagram photo by coloredkid
Patch Instagram photo by mlygallery

Ordinance to Put Limits on Septic Waste Transfers in the Works

A draft ordinance seeks require smaller trucks that transfer septic waste to bigger trucks to use odor-reducing carbon filters on Malibu roadways.

Ordinance to Put Limits on Septic Waste Transfers in the Works

City staff is seeking direction from the Malibu City Council on a draft ordinance that looks to address complaints about a sewage smell from trucks transferring septic waste on Malibu roadways.

The council will discuss the draft ordinance on pumper truck transfers at its Dec. 10 meeting at Malibu City Hall, according to a newly released agenda.

In late September, the Malibu Wastewater Advisory Committee voted to recommend turning down an outright ban on the transfers within Malibu's city limits, recognizing that septic systems are an integral part of most Malibu homes and businesses. 

"Because we have a decentralized system in the City of Malibu, the pumper trucks are part of the infrastructure," said Steve Braband, vice chair of the committee. "... The million dollar question is where would be a suitable area for the transfers?”

According to the committee, the smaller trucks are needed to traverse Malibu's narrow roadways to reach homes. The smaller trucks then transfer their septic waste loads into larger trucks, which make three-to-four trips a day to Carson and Van Nuys.

Instead of an outright ban on city streets, the committee recommended a draft ordinance that would restrict where and when the transfers could take place, as well as require all trucks to use odor-reducing equipment.

The committee proposed that the city conduct a feasibility study of two or three sites that would have little impact on residential areas during the hours of 1 to 5 a.m. In addition, the committee asked for the city to consider a transfer facility at the future Civic Center Wastewater Treatment Plant.

The city's Local Coastal Program does not address pumper truck transfers, but does allow wastewater storage and hauling in the commerical zone with a conditional use permit.

Officials from the Tapia Water Reclamation Facility declined the city's earlier request to allow the transfers to take place on its property, according to Andrew Sheldon, the City of Malibu's environmental health administrator.

During the September meeting, Richard Sherman, co-chair of the committee, said the trucks are part of Malibu’s infrastructure.

“They are a necessary evil, if you want to think about it that way,” Sherman said.

He said he is aware the transfer of effluent causes a visual and odor problem at times.

“I think Tapaia will not do it for political reasons. It has nothing to do with reality,” Sherman said, adding that he believes someone needs to put pressure on L.A. County and Tapia.

Andy Lyon, who is also on the committee, said he believed the city cannot ban the transfers.

"It seems like without any spills on record, it’s really become this thing like the food truck and the junk trunks," Lyon said.

He added that the city needs to find a place where the trucks can pump that is hidden from the public's eye.

“It will just be the excuse of why we need sewers," Lyon said.

Ely Jr. Simental, owner of Ely Jr.'s Pumping Service, said he alternately parks his trucks near Heathercliff Road and Pacific Coast Highway and Civic Cener Way near Malibu Canyon Road.

"I try to shift from one site to the other site because I know the people daily see them," Simental said.

He said L.A. County does not allow the pumping on county roads outside the city limits and that his company has a record of no spills and no traffic accidents. 

Simental said commercial pumping can take place in the early morning hours, but that the pumper trucks cannot enter residential neighborhoods until after 7 a.m.

Share This Article