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Los Angeles, We're No. 1 ... in Most Energy-Saving Buildings

It's the sixth year in a row that the EPA has made this designation.

Los Angeles, We're No. 1 ... in Most Energy-Saving Buildings

For the sixth year, Los Angeles tops the list of cities with the highest number of energy efficient buildings, according to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's annual report released today.

The 25 cities on the list demonstrate the economic and environmental benefits achieved by facility owners and managers when they apply a proven approach to energy efficiency to their buildings, the EPA said.

Los Angeles ranks first with more than 443 Energy Star buildings. San Diego comes in at 15th place with 123 buildings and Riverside in 22nd place with 75 buildings.

In Southern California, the more than 641 Energy Star-certified buildings helped save $179 million in annual utility bills while preventing greenhouse gas emissions equal to emissions from the annual electricity use of more than 55,100 homes, the EPA said.

"Not only are the Energy Star top 25 cities saving money on energy costs and increasing energy efficiency, but they are promoting public health by decreasing greenhouse gas emissions from commercial buildings," said EPA administrator Gina McCarthy said. "Every city has an important role to play in reducing emissions and carbon pollution, and increasing energy efficiency to combat the impacts of our changing climate."

Energy use in commercial buildings accounts for 17 percent of U.S. greenhouse gas emissions at a cost of more than $100 billion per year.

Energy Star office buildings cost 50 cents less per square foot to operate than average office buildings and use nearly two times less energy per square foot, according to the agency.

--City News Service


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