15 Sep 2014
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Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps
Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps
Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps
Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps
Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps
Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps
Patch Instagram photo by apennyforyourwraps

Teachers' Pay Cut Not as Steep as First Proposed

Although teachers agreed to a 10.1 percent pay cut to end their strike in April, some extra money from the state will shrink that number to 6.49 percent.

Teachers will make more money than they thought they would after last year’s strike, now that the Capistrano Unified School District is restoring some of their salary.

When the teachers’ strike ended in April, they agreed to a 10.1 percent reduction over three years. The district announced Thursday that teachers will instead see a 6.49 percent reduction for the 2009-10 and 2010-11 school years.

The April settlement also included several mandatory, unpaid furlough days. However, the . Adding those two instructional days—Feb. 17 and May 27—back onto the calendar will cost the district $2.8 million.

The teachers will still take three non-instructional, “staff development” days unpaid in accordance with their post-strike settlement.

The April strike saw 90 percent of the district’s teachers form picket lines for three days, according to published reports at the time. The 10.1 percent proposed pay cut was the same number the district was seeking before the strike. However, after the strike, the school officials agreed to wording promising to restore pay and furlough days should the district come into extra money.

In October, the state Legislature passed a budget that included $2.8 billion more than educators across the state had anticipated. For , that translated into an extra $13.5 million.

“Knowing that the trustees and superintendent are willing to keep the promises that were made last year will go a long way toward restoring the trust necessary to be successful in spite of the continued challenges facing public education,” said Vicki Soderberg, president of the Capistrano Unified Education Association in a statement.

In a message to the teachers, the union leader said: “Make no mistake about it, under the board-imposed contract, there would have been no automatic restoration. Our collective action, at great personal sacrifice, righted a wrong which ultimately benefited all employees—classified and administrative as well.” Soderberg posted the message after the district in December restored the two instructional days.

In the last three years, the district has trimmed about $90 million from its budget, according to a district press release.

Current financial solvency does not mean the district is out of the financial woods. The 2011-12 year could see a $10 million-$17 million budget shortfall, a district press release says.

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