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Solar Eclipse Tonight: Where & How to View It Safely

Create a do-it-yourself, 'pinhole projector.' Don't risk serious damage to your eyes Sunday by looking directly at the sun. Join an "eclipse party."

Solar Eclipse Tonight: Where & How to View It Safely Solar Eclipse Tonight: Where & How to View It Safely

 

A partial solar eclipse will darken the sun between 5:16 and 7:40 p.m. Sunday. Optimal viewing time is 6:33 pm.

This event is called an " annular eclipse." The last time one took place was 18 years ago. The next one visible from the mainland United States won't be until 2023.

Astronomers advise eclipse-watchers to be careful.

Start by making a do-it-yourself pinhole projector. View the eclipse by turning your back to the sun and letting the sun shine through the pinhole onto a piece of paper. From there, the progression of the moon's path can be seen.

  The in Oakland will have an Eclipse Viewing Party for $5, beginning at 5 p.m.

The Lawrence Hall of Science in Berkeley will have a viewing for free on its deck, and charge $5 for activities inside. "This will be the best partial eclipse seen from Berkeley until 2045," it says says enticingly on its website. "Don’t miss it. And bring the whole family!"

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