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Tracking Sandy's Approach

After she makes landfall on Tuesday morning, Sandy will then collide with a cold front, producing up to a foot of rain over the two-day period and possibly snow in the inland areas, according to the National Weather Service.

Tracking Sandy's Approach

 

1:30 p.m. Saturday:

The National Weather Service's National Hurricane Center is reporting that Hurricane Sandy is moving slowly away from the Bahamas and Florida and that tropical force winds are now impacting the coast of North Carolina.

Currently the storm is packing sustained winds of up to 75 miles per hour and is moving north across the Atlantic at about 9 miles per hour.

Presently the storm is located about 190 miles north-north-east of Great Abaco Island, SC, and about 355 miles southeast of Charlseton, SC. It is expected to make landfall either in New Jersey or Delaware around 8 a.m. Tuesday, however it is expected to impact a wide swath of the eastern seaboard, from Cape Hatteras, SC to Bangor Maine.

The 105-mile-wide storm is expected to start impacting the Connecticut coast starting around 8 a.m. Monday, according to the National Weather Service. After she makes landfall on Tuesday morning, Sandy will then collide with a cold front coming from the north, producing up to a foot of rain over the two-day period and possibly snow in the inland areas, according to the National Weather Service.

Tidal surge is expected to be 1 to 1.5 feet higher than normal on Monday and 2 to 3 feet above normal on Tuesday as the storm passes through the region. Widespread moderate to sever flooding is anticipated.

A full moon nearly coinciding with Sandy's arrival could mean even stronger tidal surge from the storm, the National Weather Service reports.

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