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Waterford Firefighters Rescue Dog From Ice

Thanks to sharp-eyed Waterford Police who spotted the dog in distress and Waterford firefighters who are specially trained for ice rescues, this "tail" has a happy ending.

Waterford Firefighters Rescue Dog From Ice Waterford Firefighters Rescue Dog From Ice Waterford Firefighters Rescue Dog From Ice
Waterford firefighters have been pretty busy rescuing dogs in distress lately. Last week, they were called to retrieve a Yorkie from a frozen storm drain. Yesterday, it was a dog that fell through ice and couldn't get out.  

Two Waterford Police Officers had spotted the dog in distress and “requisitioned” a resident’s small row boat in an effort to rescue the dog. At about 2:50 p.m. on Jan. 15, Waterford Fire Engine Co. 1, along with Goshen Fire Department (3) were dispatched to 19 East Neck Road to help. 

Jordan Village's Engine 11 responded with a crew of two career firefighters and one volunteer firefighter. Waterford Police Officers assisted in final preparation and deployment of two rescue swimmers.  

The two rescue swimmers entered the frigid water wearing rescue suits designed to keep out the wet and the cold. Both swimmers were tethered with a safety line as they waded out to the canine, breaking the thin ice as they went.

Firefighters say the dog was tired and scared when they reached it but was calm as they lifted the animal into the row boat and brought it safely to shore. The canine was turned over to the City of New London’s Animal Control Officer who transported it to a local vet for evaluation.

Thanks to sharp-eyed Waterford Police who spotted the dog in distress and Waterford firefighters, who are specially trained for ice rescues, this "tail" has a happy ending. 
 

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