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West Hartford History: What is Happening in this Photo?

Test your knowledge of West Hartford history with this photo from the archives of the Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society.

West Hartford History: What is Happening in this Photo? West Hartford History: What is Happening in this Photo?

If you think you know the answer or have a special memory related to the photo, respond in the "Leave a comment" box below this article. We'll run the answer next Monday, along with a new historical photo. The image has been provided by the Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society. For more information on the museum's collection and programs, visit www.noahwebsterhouse.org.

Last week's question was "Whose Home Was This?" and Rick Liftig was quick to provide the correct answer: "This is the house of Sarah Whitman and Thomas Hart Hooker who lived there during the latter part of the 18th century. Construction of the house commenced between 1715 and 1720 by Ensign Timothy Seymour. In its early years, the house served also as a tavern, which supplemented the farm income.This house still stands at the top of New Britain Avenue's "four mile hill" in the Elmwood area. It is the oldest house in West Hartford. There is plenty more information and you can schedule a tour at www.sarahwhitmanhooker.com."

Several other readers thought this might be the Hatheway Homestead, which was on the corner of Asylum and North Main St., but Rick had the right answer.

Jeff Murray added this detail: "Just to add to Rick's comment, the massive ancient elm tree planted in the front yard, seen in the photograph, was removed in late December 1953 because it was rotting away from the effects of Dutch elm disease, which had been plaguing the memorable elm trees along New Britain Avenue in the 1940s."

The official answer from the Noah Webster House & West Hartford Historical Society is: "This house located on New Britain Avenue belonged to Sarah Whitman Hooker. Built c. 1726, the house was used to house British officers captured during the American Revolution. This photograph shows the house in 1928."

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