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Whose Job Is It?

December 12, 2013 was when this deer was hit and killed. Twelve days later, the carcass remains. Gwinnett County has been called multiple times. The deer is on the right of way. This post has generated much discussion yet no action. Any ideas???

Whose Job Is It? Whose Job Is It?
For the second year in a row the residents of Spalding Corners have the great misfortune of experiencing the slow and painful process of dead animal decomposition.  Each stage of this gruesome process is on display for all of those that care to look.  And then there is the smell.  Some say to just look away but getting everyone in the car to pinch their nose is just not possible.  This brings me to the million dollar question.  Whose job is it to clean this and other dead animal carcasses up?  Is it the City of Peachtree Corners or is it Gwinnett County?  Numerous residents of Spalding Corners have contacted Gwinnett County and asked that the carcass be removed but as of this posting the lesson continues.  Last year it took a dead fawn about two months to totally absorb into the ground around where it was dragged to die.  Today, very close to the same location, lies an adult male deer that is roughly 3 times the size of it's smaller predecessor.  Since the weather outside is nice and cold the residents of Spalding Corners and all those that traverse Spalding Drive on a daily basis are sure to have a very thorough lesson in dead animal decomposition thanks to the lack of attention and responsiveness from the governmental authority having jurisdiction over this issue.

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