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‘MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF MS’ WORKSHOP FOR THOSE CARING FOR A LOVED ONE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS TAKING PLACE IN EVANSTON BEGINNING JULY 2

‘MEETING THE CHALLENGES OF MS’ WORKSHOP FOR THOSE CARING FOR A LOVED

 

ONE WITH MULTIPLE SCLEROSIS TAKING PLACE IN EVANSTON BEGINNING JULY 2

 

 

CHICAGO – Do you want to be more confident in your abilities to provide support and assistance to loved ones living with multiple sclerosis? Are you prepared to manage expected and unexpected challenges that may arise? Do you want to learn how to better take care of your own health and well-being so that you can continue to provide the best support possible for your loved one? Meeting the Challenges of MS: Providing Support through Problem Solving, a five-week workshop series presented by the National Multiple Sclerosis Society, Greater Illinois Chapter, addresses these questions and much more.

 

Meeting the Challenges takes place at the Evanston Hospital, 2650 Ridge Ave., in Evanston, beginning on Wednesday, July 2, and occurs on consecutive Wednesdays for five weeks through July 30. The series, led by a professional occupational therapist, focuses on empowering care partners to identify and choose healthy alternative responses to provide adequate care while defusing their own stress and frustration. This event is specifically for those individuals who are caring for someone with MS. Participants are encouraged to attend all five sessions. Programs are free of charge and light refreshments are provided.

 

Reservation can be made online at msillinois.org or by calling 1.800.344.4867. Registration is required; no walk-ins allowed. For questions or more information about Meeting the Challenges, contact Nicole Sammartino, client services manager, at 312.423.1127 or nicole.sammartino@nmss.org.

 

Multiple sclerosis, an unpredictable, often disabling disease of the central nervous system, interrupts the flow of information within the brain, and between the brain and body. Symptoms range from numbness and tingling to blindness and paralysis. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS in any one person cannot yet be predicted, but advances in research and treatment are moving us closer to a world free of MS. Most people with MS are diagnosed between the ages of 20 and 50, with at least two to three times more women than men being diagnosed with the disease. MS affects more than 20,000 people in Illinois and 2.3 million worldwide

 

The Greater Illinois Chapter mobilizes people and resources to drive research for a cure and to address the challenges of everyone affected by MS.  The Chapter envisions a world free of MS and moves toward that end by driving change through advocacy, facilitating education, collaborating with others and by providing helpful programs and services. Visit MSIllinois.org for more information.

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