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Oswego School Board Learns About Principal Evaluation Process

Eventually, student achievement will account for half of administrators' reviews.

Oswego School Board Learns About Principal Evaluation Process
Submitted by Oswego School District 308:

Assistant Superintendent for Administrative Services Dr. John Sparlin presented School District 308 Board of Education with the formula used to evaluate principals in each of the district’s 22 schools.
 
“The process from beginning to end is an extremely detailed one and is designed not only to evaluate, but also to professionally develop our administrators,” Dr. Sparlin said at the March 10 board meeting.

The assessment focuses on collaborative goal setting, formal observation, principal self-assessment, and a final summative evaluation. The evaluation concentrates on the following six leadership standards:
 
  • Living a mission, vision, and belief for results
  • Leading and managing systems change
  • Improving teaching and learning
  • Building and maintaining collaborative relationships
  • Leading with integrity and professionalism
  • Creating and sustaining a culture of high expectations
At this time, a professional practice rating accounts for 75 percent of a principal’s evaluation score, while student growth goals make up the remaining 25 percent. Over the next several years, the student achievement percentage of the annual evaluation will increase to 50 percent.
 
“The annual evaluation of our administrative team will include a significant portion aligned to student achievement and district approved priorities. The evaluation system will be one part of the equation that results in improved teacher instruction and student learning,” said Superintendent Matthew Wendt. “I support performance-based evaluations and look forward to increased accountability. Student achievement is our primary responsibility, and how students perform should be a part of the evaluation instrument.”

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