21 Aug 2014
86° Partly Cloudy
Patch Instagram photo by legallyblonde27
Patch Instagram photo by legallyblonde27
Patch Instagram photo by ermyceap
Patch Instagram photo by taratesimu
Patch Instagram photo by taratesimu
Patch Instagram photo by lilyava299
Patch Instagram photo by _mollfairhurst
Patch Instagram photo by thecontemporaryhannah
Patch Instagram photo by lucyketch

Legislation Boosts Neighborhood Associations' Power

Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke is submitting a bill and resolution seeking to improve neighborhood association standing to challenge zoning decisions.

Legislation Boosts Neighborhood Associations' Power

Legislation set for introduction in the City Council would increase Baltimore neighborhood associations' power to challenge zoning decisions made by the city.

Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke will introduce on Monday a bill intended to give neighborhood associations the ability to appeal decisions made by the city’s Zoning Administrator, and a resolution requesting that the city’s state legislators support a bill granting standing to groups challenging Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals opinions in court.    

Currently Baltimore law doesn’t give neighborhood associations the legal ability to appeal decisions—such as allowing a business to open in the neighborhood—or grant them standing with the Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals during a hearing.

The bill, as proposed by Clarke, would grant neighborhood associations registered with the city’s Planning Department those rights. 

The resolution introduced by Clarke, also calls for the council to ask the city’s General Assembly delegation to craft and support legislation that would grant neighborhood associations the right to challenge decisions made by the Board of Municipal and Zoning Appeals in court.

Currently state and city law provides only "near neighbors" standing before the board or in court. Clarke said these pieces of legislation would allow the neighborhood associations to stand up and pursue actions that individual neighbors don’t have the time to pursue.

"In many neighborhoods the near neighbors don’t have the time or means to go to court," Clarke said.

She said that the state has already granted neighborhood associations in Prince George’s and Montgomery counties standing to challenge zoning decisions in court.

She also said she hasn’t spoke to any state lawmakers to gauge their interest in supporting such legislation.

"I’d like to have the support of the City Council and then ask legislators," Clarke said.

Sign up for our newsletter, and follow us on  Facebook and  Twitter. Contact editor Adam Bednar with any news tips. Want to write on your own? Skip the middle man.  Join our Local Voices.

Share This Article