14 Sep 2014
59° Partly Cloudy
Patch Instagram photo by longunderwearman
Patch Instagram photo by quadrofoglio
Patch Instagram photo by athomeinmygarden
Patch Instagram photo by daniellemastersonbooks
Patch Instagram photo by healthandbeautynz
Patch Instagram photo by andreagazeapt
Patch Instagram photo by reh_22
Patch Instagram photo by athomeinmygarden
Patch Instagram photo by pespatchpsp

Overlea, New Town Students Job Shadow At Stanley Black & Decker

The opportunity was the result of a partnership between the schools, Junior Achievement, and the Towson-based company.

Overlea, New Town Students Job Shadow At Stanley Black & Decker Overlea, New Town Students Job Shadow At Stanley Black & Decker Overlea, New Town Students Job Shadow At Stanley Black & Decker

A group of Baltimore County students got a first-hand opportunity to see the how the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) parts of their education work in real life.

Sixteen students from Overlea High School's Academy of Finance, 10 students from New Town High School and 10 students from Baltimore City's National Academy Foundation High School paid a visit to a variety of business leaders at Towson-based Stanley, Black & Decker on Friday.

The students were able to learn about recruiting, engineering, marketing and business management during the three-and-a-half-hour-long program organized by the education non-profit Junior Achievement of Central Maryland.

"Before visiting Stanley Black & Decker I never knew that they sold 10 items every second. Also, I learned that passion for your work can lead to excellence," said Overlea High's Olivia Van Hoff.

Earlier this year both State and county leaders emphasized the importance of STEM education.

"BCPS has a good foundation but ultimately we can do better," John Quinn, executive director of STEM for Baltimore County Public Schools, told Patch's Nick DiMarco back in April. "If we can somehow give kids a reason for wanting to study in the STEM field—if a math teacher can answer why quadratic equations are important and how you could use them—those are the types of things that we think will start to inspire more kids to want to pursue STEM careers."

Do you agree with the emphasis being placed on Science, Technology, Engineering and Math? Tell us in the comments.

Share This Article