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UPDATED: Concord's Water Bottle Ban Having Little Effect in Acton

Most store managers reporting normal sales since the ban went into effect on Jan. 1.

UPDATED: Concord's Water Bottle Ban Having Little Effect in Acton

(UPDATED: 12 P.M.)

If you thought Concord residents might flood Acton stores in search of bottled water since the ban went into effect on Jan. 1, don't worry.

According to store managers from Roche Bros., Stop & Shop and CVS, there's plenty of bottled water to go around.

“I haven’t noticed any difference or anything,” said Trent McShea, assistant store manager of CVS at 393 Massachusetts Ave., in Acton. “It’s going through the front door as usual. No effect seen here.”

The only store in Acton to report a spike in sales is Tedeschi's, where owner Mike Abboud said the impact was almost immediate.

"I felt it. We're right on border with Concord," Abboud said. "The 24 packs and gallons are going crazy."

Abboud said bottled water sales increased by 20 to 30 percent on Jan. 1 when the ban went into affect. He said purposely stocked up, thinking Concord residents may make the short trek across the border.

"My location is very busy," Abboud said. "We're getting four delivers a week and managing not to run out for anybody."

The Attorney General's Office issued its approval of the bylaw on Sept. 5.

The bylaw prohibits the sale of non-sparkling, unflavored drinking water in PET bottles of one liter or less.

“It’s been fine so far, no difference,” said Jamie Smith, Stop & Shop assistant store manager. “It’s usually slow this time of year anyway. We should have a better feel by mid next week.”

Concord is the first town in the nation to issue such a ban.

Local activists battled for three years for the ban, which they say will help in the reduction in waste and fossil fuel use.

After the first couple days, though, the ban doesn't seem to have an adverse effect in the community.

“It’s too early to tell,” said Kevin Fry, Roche Bros. manager in Acton. “I haven’t seen any extra activity. Stores aren’t tremendously busy now. When towns (declare) water bans, maybe then. There’s certainly been a lot of talk about it. But I haven’t seen our water-bottle shelves empty."

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