15 Sep 2014
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Patch Instagram photo by marbleheadpatch
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Patch Instagram photo by bobwelch
Patch Instagram photo by marbleheadpatch
Patch Instagram photo by marbleheadpatch
Patch Instagram photo by marbleheadpatch
Patch Instagram photo by marbleheadpatch

MBTA Ridership Up, Even After Fare Hike

The MBTA has released its latest ridership data, which shows an increase in riders in the month following a 5 percent fare increase.

MBTA Ridership Up, Even After Fare Hike

Ridership on the MBTA’s subways, commuter trains, buses and boats went up this summer, even after a fare hike, according to data released on Friday by the T.

On July 1, T fares went up by 5 percent, on average. The bus fare went from $1.50 to $1.60, subway fare from $2 to $2.10 and commuter rail fares went up by 25 cents for most stations close to Boston and 50 cents for outer stations for a one-way trip and the cost of a monthly pass went up from $9 to $17.

The increase in July was the sixth straight month that T ridership went up. There were also more T riders in July 2014 versus July 2013 - up 3 percent to an average of 1.219 million riders each weekday.

More people rode commuter rail and buses in July than any July since 2010, according to data from the T, but subway ridership was lower than almost every July in the past five years. The subway drop came mostly on the green line, since ridership on the blue, orange and red lines were all up in July.

The largest increase came on commuter boats, which primarily serve the South Shore and Logan Airport, with an average of 6,800 riders each weekday.

Weekends in July also played a part in the increase, with Saturday ridership up 3.6 percent versus July 2013 and Sunday ridership up by 1.4 percent.

Fiscal year 2014 ended on June 30 with fare revenue of $624.4 million - 2.1 percent above fiscal year 2013, according to the T.

“Combined with our cost-cutting initiatives, the increased fare collections resulted in overall revenues exceeding total expenses by $14.2 million in fiscal year 2014,” said MBTA General Manager Dr. Beverly Scott. “That money goes directly into our Capital Maintenance Fund to help pay for much-needed repairs and upgrades to our aging infrastructure.”

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