20 Aug 2014
78° Clear
Patch Instagram photo by legallyblonde27
Patch Instagram photo by legallyblonde27
Patch Instagram photo by ermyceap
Patch Instagram photo by taratesimu
Patch Instagram photo by taratesimu
Patch Instagram photo by lilyava299
Patch Instagram photo by _mollfairhurst
Patch Instagram photo by thecontemporaryhannah
Patch Instagram photo by lucyketch

Wilmington Company Donates Money and Clothing to Sandy Victims

In total, UniFirst donated 7,000 pieces of clothing for victims of the hurricane.

Wilmington Company Donates Money and Clothing to Sandy Victims

Hurricane Sandy victims are still in need of help even months after the storm that devastated New York and New Jersey. Thanks to a Wilmington based company, some of the impacted residents are getting some help this winter.

UniFirst is sending 7,000 fleece jackets, sweatshirts, and other clothing items to Little Ferry, New Jersey, according to a release from PRNewswire.com. The items have a retail value of about $200,000 and the company is also making a donation of $6,000 for Red Cross relief efforts.

“I made some inquiries and it quickly became a UniFirst team effort,” said Catalina Dongo, human resources manager at the UniFirst corporate office. “Virtually everyone in our corporate office and our hundreds of locations throughout the U.S. and Canada supported the relief effort.”

According to the press release, Little Ferry was selected to receive the donations after the company learned it was one of the towns most impacted by the October storm. There are about 11,000 residents in the town.

Hurricane Sandy hit particularly close to home for UniFirst, according to Richard Powell, the general manager for UniFirst in Whippany, N.J.

“We’ve had uniform rental and laundering facilities in New Jersey servicing area businesses for many years, so it was particularly gratifying that we could help some of our ‘neighbors’ in need,” Powell said.

Among those grateful for the donation was Mayor Mauro D. Raguseo, who said the incoming winter months make the materials necessary for residents.

“We will be forever thankful to UniFirst,” said Raguseo.

Share This Article