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Grosse Pointe North Students Earn AP Scholar Awards

Ninety Grosse Pointe North students score in top 18 percent of 1.9 million students who took AP exams.

Grosse Pointe North Students Earn AP Scholar Awards

 

GROSSE POINTE WOODS - Ninety students at Grosse Pointe North High School have earned AP Scholar Awards in recognition of theirexceptional achievement on AP exams.

The College Board’s Advanced Placement Program provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to take rigorous college level courses while still in high school, and to earn college credit, advanced placement, or both for successful performance on the AP exams.

About 18 percent of the more than 1.9 million students worldwide who took AP exams performed at a sufficiently high level to also earn an AP Scholar Award.
The College Board recognizes several levels of achievement based on students’ performance on AP exams.

At Grosse Pointe North High School, eight students qualified for the National AP Scholar Award by earning an average score of 4 or higher on a five-point scale on all AP Exams taken, and scores of 4 or higher on eight or more of these exams. These students are: Kevin Kain, Alexandra Krawetz, Mary Krusz, Mark Linington, Tristan Mora, Andrew Remenar, Brett Slajus, Edward Surmont.

Thirty-one students qualified for the AP Scholar with Distinction Award by earning an average score of at least 3.5 on all AP exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on five or more of these exams. These students are: Joseph Carron, Amy Cooper, Jennifer Cusmano, Natasha Eklund, Nicole Fricke, Kevin Kain, Ryan Kenney, Alexandra Krawetz, Mary Krusz, Mark Linnington, Megann McCuen, James McNelis, Christian Mellos, Tristan Mora, Kimberly Morawski, Lakshman Mulpuri, Katherine Murray, Rachel Premack, Matthew Przybysz, Justin Rakowicz, Andrew Remenar, Daniel Schrage, Claire Schreiber, Stacy Sharon, Brett Slajus, Edward Surmont, Kathryn VanEgmond, Courtney Veneri, Nathan Vengalil, Suzanne Vyletel, Ryan Waggoner.

Nineteen students qualified for the AP Scholar with Honor Award by earning an average score of at least 3.25 on allAP Exams taken, and scores of 3 or higher on four or more of these exams. These students are: Hunter Brennan, Michelle Burns, Noah Cherry, Christopher Cyr, Michael Francis, Jaclyn Gabel, Connor Holm, Christopher Jakab, ZacharyJatkowski, Ellen Koppy, Laura O’Brien, Jordan Radke, Kelsey Richards, Jessica Richter, Daniel Santalucia, Stephanie Saravolatz, Ian Thompson, Stamatia Tsakos, Amy Zaranek.

Forty students qualified for the AP Scholar Award by completing three or more AP Exams with scores of 3 or higher. The AP Scholars are: Alexander Arnold, Ian Aufdemberge, Kristin Carlson, Courtney Carroll, Francesca Ciaramitaro,Kimberly Cusmano, Jessie Ding, Julia Ellis, Allison Francis, Evan Gallagher, Kyle Garvin, Matt Giancona, Jack Gruber,Danielle Haggerty, Jeremy Harr, Logan Hart, Ronald Illagan, Roxanne Illagan, Kamala Kanneganti, Michelle Kavanaugh, David Kracht, Colleen Livingston, Laura Lleshaj, Allison Maggart, Andrew McLauchlan, Carly Mellos, Erick Michaelson,Robert Morgan, Michael Plouffe, Michelle Rabaut, Savannah Ransome, Lucas Segovia, Stephanie Shenouda, Sarah Sherer, Riley Smith, Taryn Smith, Samantha Sternad, Georgios Teftis, Zachary White, Michael Zheng.

Through 34 different college-level courses and exams, AP provides willing and academically prepared students with the opportunity to earn college credit or advanced placement and stand out in the college admission process. Each exam is developed by a committee of college and university faculty and AP teachers, ensuring that AP Examsare aligned with the same high standards expected by college faculty at some of the nation’s leading liberal arts andresearch institutions. More than 3,800 colleges and universities annually receive AP scores. Most four-year colleges in the United States provide credit and/or advanced placement for qualifying exam scores.

Research consistently shows that AP students who score a 3 or higher on AP Exams (based on a scale from 1 to 5, with 5 being the highest) typically experience greater academic success in college and have higher college graduation rates than students whodo not participate in AP.

The college board is a mission driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity.

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