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Maple Grove Writer Featured Nationally on Barnes and Noble's Nook First

Thomas Sullivan is a Pulitzer nominee who has written seven novels.

Maple Grove Writer Featured Nationally on Barnes and Noble's Nook First Maple Grove Writer Featured Nationally on Barnes and Noble's Nook First

“What excites me,” said writer Thomas Sullivan, “is to write every day, anything from email, to a column, to a book.”

Sullivan, a Maple Grove resident, earned a Pulitzer nomination for his second novel, The Phases of Harry Moon. In all he has 90 publishing credits, including novels, short stories, and guest columns for Dearreader.com. His seven novels are in 21 foreign and domestic editions. 

For Sullivan, writing has always come naturally. He called it a way to empty the well of words inside him and even to de-stress. Writing, said Sullivan, is about more than simply content; it’s about style.

His style defies genre labels. Others have alternately described his novels as fantasy, mystery, and thriller. Sullivan doesn’t care for labels.

“I just write people stories,” he said.

Starting July 23, an author’s expanded edition of Sullivan’s novel Dust of Eden will be featured in Barnes and Noble’s Nook First, which highlights four books for thirty days. Nook First will place the book before a national audience, Sullivan said. Samples of the book are available on Amazon and Barnes and Noble.

Currently, three of Sullivan’s books are available as e-books: The Martyring, Second Soul, and Dust of Eden. A fourth book, Born Burning will soon be available. An audio version of The Martyring, read by Bob Walter, is on Audible.com.

Sullivan's novels have placed him in the literary category, giving him critical success, but not always widespread commercial appeal, he said. He would like to expand his audience.

“I’m looking for that big cross over,” Sullivan said, “and I’m trying to establish that I write books that are exciting to read, but still intelligently written.”

With a combination of thriller elements, well-drawn characters, and good writing, Dust of Eden accomplishes just that, Sullivan noted.

Said Sullivan, “I’m still a man without a country. I’m somebody you can’t label.”

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