22 Aug 2014
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Patch Instagram photo by lunasavestheday
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Patch Instagram photo by lunasavestheday
Patch Instagram photo by lunasavestheday
Patch Instagram photo by lunasavestheday
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New Entrance, Exit Roadways Planned for Parkway Interchange 91

New entrances, exits to be built near Burnt Tavern, Burrsville roads

New Entrance, Exit Roadways Planned for Parkway Interchange 91
Ocean County officials will soon take the first step in a long-awaited project that County Engineer Frank Scarantino says will ease traffic congestion throughout Brick Township.

The project will be led by the county but will be funded by the state, Scarantino said. It has been in the works for close to nine years, but is just getting off the ground after nearly a decade of land acquisitions, obtaining permits and other holdups.

The project is ambitious and will reshape a portion of northern Brick Township.

"We are providing all of the missing moves from every direction," said Scarantino.

Under the project, a new southbound entrance will be constructed from westbound Burnt Tavern Road as part of a new roadway that will cross Lanes Mill Road and lead to the highway. The roadway will be constructed behind the Cherrywood Farm development in Brick, which will receive a noise wall to block highway noise for residents. Southbound traffic on the Parkway will exit onto Burrsville Road by way of another roadway that will constructed as part of the project.

There will also be a northbound exit and entrance on Burssville utilizing new roads that will be built.

Herborn Avenue will be extended to support the project as a whole, and the current northbound ramp will be "slid over" in order to create a new Parkway access point near the Park and Ride location, Scarantino said.

The current intersection at the northbound ramp entrance will be eliminated in order to improve traffic flow, he said.

The current estimate for the project is $22 million and is fully funded by the state, with only a few punch list items – which will likely total less than $500,000 – falling under county jurisdiction.

"Much of this came with input from Brick Township, and had to do with traffic flow throughout the town," said Freeholder Jack Kelly.

Kelly said county engineering officials would soon be reaching out to Mayor John Ducey and other recently-elected township officials who may not have been part of the original planning process.

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