Jul 26, 2014
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Unclear Whether Sequester Will Impact NWS Earle Jobs

At least 11,000 civilian jobs under the military readiness category will be furloughed as a result of the budget cuts.

Unclear Whether Sequester Will Impact NWS Earle Jobs

It may be too soon to tell what impact the sequester will have on local employment at NWS Earle in Colts Neck, but cuts take effect as soon as March 1.

According to a statement from the White House, at least 11,000 civilian jobs under the military readiness category will be furloughed in New Jersey as a result of the budget cuts.

Michael Brady, an NWS Earle spokesperson, said there are 450 civilian Department of Defense jobs on the base, but individual impact on each base is being handled by the DOD.

Phone calls to the DOD Naval Press Office were not immediately returned.

Through sequestration, the federal government would also save $75 million by furloughing 11,000 civilian military contractors, and another $59 million by cutting funding to military bases. 

The cuts would include:  

  • Approximately $11.7 million in funding for primary and secondary education.
  • About $17 million in funds for about 210 teachers, aides, and staff who help children with disabilities.
  • Head Start and Early Head Start services would be eliminated for approximately 1,300 children.
  • New Jersey would lose about $4,891,000 in environmental funding, and $472,000 in grants for fish and wildlife protection.
  • Approximately 11,000 civilian Department of Defense employees would be furloughed.
  • Army base operation funding would be cut by about $52 million in New Jersey. Funding for Air Force operations in New Jersey would be cut by about $7 million.
  • New Jersey will lose about $336,000 in Justice Assistance Grants.
  • Up to 600 disadvantaged and vulnerable children could lose access to child care.
  • Around 3,930 fewer children will receive vaccines.
  • New Jersey will lose approximately $840,000 in funds to help upgrade its ability to respond to public health threats including infectious diseases, natural disasters, and biological, chemical, nuclear, and radiological events. New Jersey will lose about $2,330,000 in grants to help prevent and treat substance abuse, resulting in around 3100 fewer admissions to substance abuse programs. And the New Jersey State Department of Health and Senior Services will lose about $752,000 resulting in around18,800 fewer HIV tests.
  • New Jersey could lose up to $187,000 in funds that provide services to victims of domestic violence, resulting in up to 700 fewer victims being served.
  • Nutrition Assistance for Seniors: New Jersey would lose approximately $488,000 in funds that provide meals for seniors.

The  total federal spending cuts would be about $1.2 trillion over the next nine years. Republicans have accused the president of using the impending cuts for political gain.

President Obama's plan asks for increased tax revenues to offset some of the trillion-dollar cuts.

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