21 Aug 2014
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This is What John Coltrane's House Looks Like Today

The brick ranch house on Candlewood Path has already been gutted by workers, and dumpsters on the site on Monday were filled with remnants of interior walls.

The Dix Hills home where saxophonist John Coltrane composed the epic "A Love Supreme" is now a Huntington town landmark, and lovers of the jazz great are hard at work trying to raise enough money to restore the home.

They've got a lot of work to do.

The brick ranch house on Candlewood Path has already been gutted by workers, and dumpsters on the site on Monday were filled with remnants of interior walls. Much of the brick exterior, however, is cracked and crumbling. Steps have collapsed into piles of loose bricks; walls slouch.

Coltrane penned "A Love Supreme" in the home, and fans of the jazz legend hope to raise $85,000 to restore the house. Son Ravi Coltrane, Santana, Elvis Costello and others recently held the benefit at En Japanese Brasserie in Manhattan.

Coltrane lived in Dix Hills with his wife Alice, and son Ravi, until his death in 1967. Then, in 1971, Alice moved the family to California and the house was eventually sold to a developer who planned to knock it down.

That's when Steve Fulgoni, who lives in Dix Hills, formed Friends of the Coltrane Home and fought for its landmark status.

Fulgoni hopes to turn the home into a music center for area kids once the building is restored.

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