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32 Twin Roxborough Homes Approved; Possibly Built by Spring

New Kingsley Court homes brings new street to Roxborough.

32 Twin Roxborough Homes Approved; Possibly Built by Spring 32 Twin Roxborough Homes Approved; Possibly Built by Spring 32 Twin Roxborough Homes Approved; Possibly Built by Spring 32 Twin Roxborough Homes Approved; Possibly Built by Spring

Roxborough soon could get 32 homes and a new cul-de-sac. The Philadelphia Zoning Board of Adjustment approved 3-0 Wednesday a plan from developer Stephen Goldner to turn an abandoned nursing home into twin homes.

With letters of support from the Roxborough Development Corporation, Wissahickon Neighbors Civic Association, and Councilman Curtis Jones, Jr. and city approval from City Planning and the Philadelphia Water Department, Goldner earned the one of the final pieces needed to build the new homes at 5627 Ridge Ave.

"This is a residential area and it makes sense for the property to be used as a residence," attorney Joseph Beller said Wednesday.

The project calls for 32, four-story, four-bedroom, 3.5 bath homes he plans to sell for around $320,000. Located at the former Ivy Ridge Nursing Home, the property creates a new road, Kingsley Court, which Mayor Michael Nutter recently signed into law. No access will exist to Houghton Street.

Although Goldner had the neighborhood backing Wednesday, it took several meetings and project guarantees for that to occur. Residents expressed concerns with traffic, parking, infringement on neighbors' property rights and the loss of plant life.

In the final plan, Goldner agreed to prevent left-hand turns onto Ridge Avenue, build a one-car garage and additional parking space, and construct a 6-foot tall privacy fence.

Wissahickon Neighbors President Andrew Bantly attended the hearing and affirmed the group's support, adding, as its letter stated, under the contingency of "the preservation of as much landscaping as possible," he said.

After a nine-month approval process, the developer said he's eager to start building. Goldner said construction couldn't begin for at least 60 days. Because he plans to build prefabricated homes, he estimates a quick turnaround.

"I'm hoping to have homes for sale in the spring. Check back in May," he said.

Other than securing building permits, Goldner needs to complete the property transaction. It's currently under an agreement of sale, pending the zoning approval.

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