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Oakton Residents Protest Proposed Girl Scout Warehouse

Residents hope to raise awareness and support

Oakton Residents Protest Proposed Girl Scout Warehouse Oakton Residents Protest Proposed Girl Scout Warehouse Oakton Residents Protest Proposed Girl Scout Warehouse Oakton Residents Protest Proposed Girl Scout Warehouse Oakton Residents Protest Proposed Girl Scout Warehouse
"We are not against the girl scouts."  

Residents who live in Justin Knoll, an Oakton neighborhood adjacent to the 68-acre Camp Crowell Girl Scout property and proposed location for a commercial storage facility want it to be known that their opposition is not personal.

The Girl Scout Council of the Nation’s Capital, a nonprofit organization that serves 64,000 girls across the region and in parts of West Virginia, plans to build a metal warehouse near the camp’s entrance on Justin Knoll Road.  

Residents contend that the warehouse will reduce property values and will be an eyesore.  They also say it will increase traffic on a residential street.

"We were blindsided with this project.  We tried to resolve this with neighborly efforts, but they want what they want without regard for the community," said Kathy Whitcraft, organizer for "Stop Industrial Oakton".

"There are many in the surrounding communities that agree that it should not be built on the campground for girls. The full time male presence and the camp now open to incoming delivery truck drivers is not in the best interest of our daughters. In fact, the Council will tell you that they try hard to not advertise that the campground is there so operating a commercial facility with access for incoming delivery truck drivers doesn’t make sense," Whitcraft added.

The 6,000-square-foot warehouse will serve as a storage facility for Girl Scout items that can be used for area troop activities.   

The Girl Scouts feel that they have done all they can do to meet the neighbors' requests.  

"At this time we are waiting for the appeal process to be completed," said Nancy Wood, Director of Public Relations for the Girl Scout Council of the Nation's Capital.   

The community organizers believe this is a land use issue.  

"It is not appropriate for this building or this use to be in our neighborhood," Whitcraft said.

Recently, the Fairfax County Board of Zoning Appeals scheduled the public hearing on November 20, 9 a.m.  

"Community support for relocating the warehouse off site is growing. Call and write your county public officials. Be part of the process," Whitcraft said.  

For more information, visit:  www.facebook.com/stopindustrialoakton

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