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No 520 Toll Bill? Best Track it Down

Didn't get a bill for your toll to cross the State Route 520 Bridge? Not an excuse, the Washington State Department of Transportation told the Seattle Times. Has this ever happened to you? What do you think?

No 520 Toll Bill? Best Track it Down No 520 Toll Bill? Best Track it Down

So, you never got a bill in the mail for crossing the State Route 520 Bridge during tolling hours?

That's no excuse to not pay the tolls, the Washington State Department of Transportation told the Seattle Times, who profiled a Mukilteo woman who had to pay $50 for one trip across the State Route 520 Bridge.

She had been waiting for the bill in the mail, but finally got a notice that included the original tolls and fees, plus a $40 fine, according to the article.

Lucinda Broussard, toll operations manager for the Washington Department of Transportation, told Seattle Times reporter Danny Westneat that the bill is a "courtesy notice," and that it is the driver's responsibility to follow up and pay the toll, or risk a fine.

There are no toll booths on the bridge and 520 bridge tolls are paid electronically, either through a pre-paid Good to Go transponder installed in a car, or over mail after cameras record the vehicle's license plate. 

However, according to the state registered vehicle owners are r esponsible for the toll whether they were driving and whether they received a bill.

That means, you have to follow up and pay no matter who was behind the wheel (as one ), and if you never got the bill in the mail.

As quoted from the tolling violations page:

Can I get my toll charges reduced? 
A judge cannot reduce the penalty amount; they can only require payment or dismiss the toll charge. Registered vehicle owners are responsible for paying tolls and the civil penalty whether or not they were driving and whether or not they received a toll bill. 

Drivers can appeal if they believe that there was a system error, because the car was sold or stolen during the crossing, or if you are not the registered owner of the vehicle. Not getting a bill is specifically mentioned by the state as not a reason to appeal the fine.

Click here to learn more about how to pay 520 tolls.

What's been your experience with the State Route 520 tolls? What do you think of the state's billing rule? Tell us in the comments.

Online

Seattle Times: State turns a 520 bridge toll bill into paradox

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