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Scaffidi Reverses Course, Will Not Seek Assembly Seat

Mayor Steve Scaffidi said it became apparent he would not be able to serve as both mayor and state representative.

Scaffidi Reverses Course, Will Not Seek Assembly Seat
Updated 3:12 p.m. Friday

Citing the logistics of juggling his current job with a state Assembly campaign and possible seat in the Legislature, Oak Creek Mayor Steve Scaffidi has changed course and will no longer run in a special election.

Scaffidi told Patch earlier this week he wanted to take on both the roles of mayor and state representative. His remarks came shortly after state Rep. Mark Honadel announced he would resign the 21st Assembly seat in mid-September.


But after a few days of consideration, he said Friday it became apparent that wouldn't be possible. 

"The residents of Oak Creek elected me to represent their city, so I feel it is important to continue to serve as mayor and focus my efforts on the considerable opportunities that lie ahead of us," Scaffidi said. 

Those "opportunities" include the massive Drexel Town Square project, which will feature a "new downtown" for Oak Creek, as well as a new business park on Oakwood Road and a redevelopment of the city's lakefront.

"Oak Creek is poised to take a leadership role in southeastern Wisconsin in new business development and job creation," Scaffidi said. "I'm honored and privileged to be a part of that story, and will continue to do whatever I can to make that a reality."

Scaffidi also dismissed speculation in a Journal Sentinel report that his decision was based on his affiliation with Mayors Against Illegal Guns or his views on gun-law reform.

He said after meeting with Republican leadership, he was not comfortable with the time commitment it would take to run in an election. 

"I'm choosing to do the job I was elected to do," he said. 

Gov. Scott Walker will set a date for a special election after Honadel officially leaves office in September, said Reid Magney, spokesman for the Government Accountability Board. 

By law, a special election must be held between 62 and 77 days after Honadel's last day, which would put the election sometime in late November or early December. 

No other candidates have publicly declared their intentions to run.

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