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Officials OK New Wave of Emerald Ash Borer Treatments

Village trustees approved bidding out for treatment of ash trees at $20,000 — in conjunction with work done by village staff — to protect from the invasive Emerald Ash Borer.

Officials OK New Wave of Emerald Ash Borer Treatments Officials OK New Wave of Emerald Ash Borer Treatments

Shorewood officials approved contracting out $20,000 to continue its treatment of local ash trees, protecting them from the emerald ash borer beetle.

In mid-2009, the village implemented a plan to address the beetle, targeting some of the 1,800 ash trees on public land that are more than eight inches in diameter and treating them with insecticide injections.

The invasive beetle bores under the bark of ash trees, disrupting the trees' ability to sustain themselves.

Shorewood has a stock of roughly 6,200 trees lining public streets, according to the village's count.

The village had to suspend treatment efforts in July 2010, however, after major flooding hit Shorewood. Sewer and road projects further pushed back the program.

Thus far, the village has expended $43,000 in treatment efforts, and 422 trees remain untreated.

This year, Shorewood officials have budgeted $30,000 for treatment efforts. Trustee Jeff Hanewall said the village will use a mix of village staff and contractors, with the $20,000 allocated toward contracts and the remaining $10,000 used to purchase treatment supplies for Department of Public Works employees.

Contract bids for Shorewood's treatment plan will be presented at a future Village Board meeting.

"There was the consideration of doing nothing, but besides the fact that we may lose trees, we would be responsible financially for removing and replacing an infected ash tree," Hanewall said. "It's better to try to save these trees."

The injections are season and weather-sensitive, and will be made as time and staff allow.

Over in Whitefish Bay, officials have constructed a management plan, . The plan is expected to cost $2.3 million over 10 years.

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